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What Brand Of Manual Stabilizer Should You Use For A DSLR Camera?

Manual Stabilizer, DSLR Camera, Glidecam stabilizer, Redking, Steadicam style stabilizers

Manual gimbal stabilizers are becoming more and more popular with videographers all over the world as they are able to offer some advantages over their motorized gimbal counterparts. Not only are they able to provide you with some excellent levels of image stabilization but they also offer smooth and natural-looking panning for your camera when in use. Even to this day, some motorized gimbals on the market have a slightly robotic feel to them that can have a negative effect on your overall image quality. In addition to this, a manual stabilizer does not need to use a motor and thus does not need a battery so you are free from the restraints of having to work within your gimbals maximum battery life.

As you would expect from any camera accessory that is growing in popularity like manual Steadicam style stabilizers, we have noticed more and more people asking about what brand of stabilizer they should be using for their DSLR cameras (https://gimbalgarage.com/best-glidecam-for-dslr/). Around five years back it was a no brainer that you would be going with something from the Glidecam range for any type of professional-level manual stabilizer work with your DSLR camera but times are changing and there are some serious competitors with great products on the market.

Although the majority of the products in the Glidecam range are great and offer you some excellent levels of image stabilization, they do have a premium price tag making them very expensive. Unfortunately, the Glidecam range price tag has remained high with little to no innovation happening over the last few years allowing competing brands to come in and win over large amounts of the market from them. Videographers used to be willing to pay the premium price tag for a Glidecam stabilizer due to the innovation and best possible materials being used in their construction but they have definitely dropped the ball over the last few years.

We would highly recommend that our readers seriously check out the Flycam Redking (https://gimbalgarage.com/flycam-redking-review/) as it offers to try similar levels of performance while being a quarter of the price of the Glidecam DGS. We have seen a number of videographers reaching out and questioning how Flycam has achieved this or outright saying it is not possible for the difference in price but it is true. The YouTube video below offers some great sample video footage of the two manual stabilizers and shows how close they are to each other performance-wise when having such a large price difference.

Flycam has essentially taken advantage of a number of advancements in metal alloys and gimbal joint technology over the last three to five years and implemented it into their Redking stabilizer. This has enabled them to offer similar performance with a very light yet robust build quality for such a low price tag. As we mentioned above, Glidecam has dropped the ball in our opinion and has not released a new stabilizer for many years meaning that they are using the older, more expensive technologies and metal alloys keeping their price tag high.

Although the Glidecam reputation is still ensuring that their product range gets them sales, if they do not release a new Steadicam style stabilizer soon or at least run a price reduction other current lineup, we can see them losing even more of the market to Flycam. On top of this, we have seen a few whispers that Flycam is going to be releasing the second version of the Redking in 2020 with even better performance, a lighter weight and a better handle grip without having to hike the price tag up much too! If this is true and the early talk about the second generation Redking is true then we feel that it will be even harder for Glidecam to hold on to their market share without taking drastic action.

Depending on what you need out of your stabilizer and what you will actually be doing with your DSLR you may have to go with something like the Glidecam DGS. On the flip side of this though, a large number of videographers should easily be able to use the Flycam Redking and have their needs met while also saving hundreds of dollars at the same time. The video that we have above shows how good its performance is and with it being a quarter of the price of the Glidecam flagship its not surprising that the Redking has gone from strength to strength throughout 2019!


More on this topic:

3 Things To Look For In A Gimbal For A Mirrorless Camera!

 

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