Gaming, Lifestyle, News, Reviews

Interesting Reading For The End Of The Year

Stack of books

When was the last time you made it a point to read traditional books? They are still published today, happily, in hard copy, just like e-books. In this article, we take a look at the most interesting publications of this year. You’re sure to find something you like among them!

Elizabeth Strout – Oh, William!

Ah, the Strout! What we have here, is a compassionate, perceptive, intimate, a little sad and a really lovely piece. The book is a stand-alone sequel to the Lucy Barton books, namely My Name is Lucy Barton and, apparently, Everything is Possible. Oh, William! is about Lucy Barton’s ex-husband and his and Lucy’s journey together, which is sparked by a surprising revelation.

If you’re not already familiar with Strout’s work, we highly recommend you check it out. They have a warm tone and wonderful, human stories about different people.

Sofi Oksanen – Dog Park

A gripping novel about two women and Ukraine.

The Dog Park is a tale of contemporary Helsinki, Finland’s capital, and the years of Ukrainian independence, the fertility business, and corruption, spanning two time periods. It is also a deeply human story of loyalty, love, and a woman who has lost a child.

Sofi Oksanen combines realism and psychological thrillers to recreate Europe’s recent history. It brings a new theme to our fiction: the world of child abduction harnessed for business.

Odd Thomas – Casino of the Dead

You won’t see any casinos in Sofi Oksanen’s Helsinki, but if you want to get a taste of the country’s casino culture before you devour your next book, check out turvallinen kasino netissä. It contains up-to-date and important information on online casinos.

And now, to Odd Thomas

Fast-food chef Odd Thomas is no ordinary young man, despite what you might think. He sees dead people. This gift – or curse – drives Odd into unexpected and dangerous situations. And so it is today, on a balmy February day in the small town of Pico Mundo in Southern California.

Odd’s childhood friend, wheelchair-bound Danny, has been kidnapped from his home. Odd’s supernaturally attuned instincts lead him to a casino destroyed by fire. As well as the ghosts, Odd faces the most fearsome of his opponents to date, a figure who inexplicably draws him to him.

Struggling against his own dark side, Odd’s mission is complicated by the hypnotized, armed-to-the-teeth musclemen of his fierce adversary. Odd’s only helper is Elvis’s weeping ghost. Before the day is out, the casino of the dead will be the scene of a battle with stakes higher than any action movie Odd Thomas has ever seen.

Maggie O’Farrell: Hamnet

We loved, oh how I loved, this book! It is truly amazing: we enjoyed every word we read and cherished the story for weeks after reading it. Maggie O’Farrell’s narrative has captivated us many times before, but this one dazzled us. A bit surprising, given the subject is a family in 1580s England.

The family happens to be that of a young Shakespeare, although the author is not called by name. His son, Hamnet, a name which, in another spelling, has spread to the theatre-loving world.

Here we live the glow of a young couple’s love, having children, and finding their place. But a black death slips into the idyll with the ships. It sows fear, and rightly so. And so it is that the twins of the family fall ill with this terrible plague.

And this is where O’Farrell’s prodigious writing skills come into their own: how sensitively, exquisitely, and utterly heartbreakingly she depicts the mother’s worry and distress. So profound was the feeling of getting under her skin that O’Farrell had to wait until her own son had passed the fateful age of 11 before she could write about it.  The fact that we are living in another time is secondary here, the reader is easily transported into the world of these people.

Holly Jackson: A good girl’s guide to murder

As a child, many of us surely loved The Famous Five, but as teenagers, detective stories no longer interested us. However, if we’d picked up a copy of The Good Girl’s Guide to Murder in high school, we’d probably have jumped off the walls with excitement.

Five years earlier, Pip’s hometown had been rocked by tragedy. High school girl Andie has disappeared, and police are convinced she was murdered by her boyfriend Sal Singh. Soon Sal is also found dead, and the cause of death is suspected to be suicide. The case remains unsolved, even though the townspeople are unanimous in their acceptance of the theory that Sal is guilty.

As part of his school project, Pip decides to find out what really happened to Andie and Sal. Readers can follow Pip’s interviews and evidence gathering. The novel unfolds like an episode of a true crime podcast, and the reader is left to piece together the clues as they read. The mystery will grip the adult reader to the end.


More on this topic:

How To Hide iCloud Books In Your iBooks Application

How To Hide iCloud Books In Your iBooks Application

Previous ArticleNext Article
THE USE OF ANY COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL IS USED UNDER THE GUIDELINES OF "FAIR USE" IN TITLE 17 § 107 OF THE UNITED STATES CODE. SUCH MATERIAL REMAINS THE COPYRIGHT OF THE ORIGINAL HOLDER AND IS USED HERE FOR THE PURPOSES OF EDUCATION, COMPARISON, AND CRITICISM ONLY. NO INFRINGEMENT OF COPYRIGHT IS INTENDEDX